Hawaiian Lionfish

Go ahead…give Lionfish a try!

Many seafood lovers may not be aware how delicious the meat of the lionfish is. There are currently no regulations on how many of these fish can be caught. In fact, it is encouraged to catch and consume as many of these invasive fish as possible. This species of saltwater fish has begun to overpopulate oceans around the globe, and they pose a threat to the ecology of our local waters. There are no known predators and 1,000 lionfish can consume over 5 million prey fish in only one year!

Although they do have venom, it is only located in their 18 spines and not in their meat.

Here at Motts Channel Seafood we sell lionfish whenever possible and the number of local restaurants making delicious menu specials out of the lionfish has recently increased. We hope to see the trend continue to spread because it is a great fish to eat and you will help the environment by doing so.

For more information, read this great article published by our friends and neighbors at Wrightsville Beach Magazine. Click here.

As shared in the article, “Motts Channel frequently has lionfish for sale, on ice in the display case alongside the traditional seafood like grouper and snapper, usually caught by commercial spearfisherman Albie Solano and his crew (“Face to Face,” June WBM).”

lionfish
Hawaiian Lionfish
Print Recipe
lionfish
Hawaiian Lionfish
Print Recipe
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a large baking dish.
  2. Place the beaten eggs in a shallow dish. Mix the almonds, coconut, sesame seeds, brown sugar, and nutmeg together in a mixing bowl. Stir the pineapple and onion together in a separate bowl. Dip each lionfish filet into the beaten eggs and press into the almond mixture.
  3. Place the coated lionfish into the prepared dish. Spread the pineapple mixture over the coated filets. Bake until the fish flakes easily with a fork, about 40 minutes.
Recipe Notes

Many seafood lovers may not be aware how delicious the meat of the lionfish is. There are currently no regulations on how many can be caught. In fact, it is encouraged to catch and consume as many of these invasive fish as possible. This species of saltwater fish has begun to overpopulate oceans around the globe, and they pose a threat to the ecology of our local waters. There are no known predators to them and 1,000 lionfish can consume over 5 million prey fish in only one year!

Want more great recipes like this?  Visit Alison’s Recipe Box by clicking here.

Although lionfish do have venom, it is only located in their 18 spines and not in their meat.

Here at Motts Channel Seafood we sell lionfish whenever possible and the number of local restaurants making delicious menu specials out of the this fish has recently increased. We hope to see the trend continue to spread because it is a great fish to eat and you will help the environment by doing so

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